DISRAELI DOCUMENTS

Phillips

UK Patent 664,186 - Phillips main image UK Patent 818,266 - Resilion Crimson Star main image UK Patent 861,607 - Resilion Crimson Star main image




see also UK Patent # 664,186 1949

see also UK Patent # 664,186 1949

UK Patent 664,186 - Phillips thumbnail


see also UK Patent # 750,110 1953

see also UK Patent # 750,110 1953

UK Patent 750,110 - Phillips thumbnail


Insist on a Phillips Derailleur Gear 1953

Insist on a Phillips Derailleur Gear 1953

Insist on a Phillips Derailleur Gear - scan 1 thumbnail



Phillips - catalogue 1954?

Phillips - catalogue 1954?

Phillips - catalogue 1954 scan 1 thumbnail


see also UK Patent # 818,266 1956

see also UK Patent # 818,266 1956

UK Patent 818,266 - Resilion Crimson Star thumbnail


see also UK Patent # 861,607 1957

see also UK Patent # 861,607 1957

UK Patent 861,607 - Resilion Crimson Star thumbnail


Phillips - catalogue 1957?

Phillips - catalogue 1957?

Phillips - catalogue 1957 scan 1 thumbnail


see also The CTC Gazette 1958 - Phillips ad

see also The CTC Gazette 1958 - Phillips ad

The CTC Gazette December 1958 - Phillips advert thumbnail


see also H. H. England - Cycling Manual 1960

see also H. H. England - Cycling Manual 1960

H H England - Cycling Manual page iii thumbnail

For such a famous firm, it is hard to find out good information on the history of Phillips Cycles. It is possible that J. A. Phillips & Co was established in Birmingham in 1904. It appears that the company moved to the Credenda Works in Smethwick, Birmingham in 1908. Phillips was described at the time as a maker of bicycles and, crucially, of bicycle components.

Phillips may have been acquired by Tube Investments in about 1920. At this point it seems to have been a manufacturer of bicycle frames and components, rather than of branded bicycles. After acquiring Hercules in 1946, Tube Investments brought all its many and various cycle companies, including Phillips, under one company - called the British Cycle Corporation. Finally in 1960 Tube Investments bought Raleigh and put the whole of the British Cycle Corporation under Raleigh’s control. From this point on, Phillips was merely a brand badge that Raleigh used as it pleased.

Throughout its existence, Phillips was as much a components business as a maker of complete cycles. In 1949 an Edward Arthur Millward of Phillips Cycles patented a design of derailleur, showing two variants, one which mounted on the axle and one which mounted on the chainstay. I believe that it released these deraileurs, branded a Phillips, in 1950, although my earliest evidence dates from 1953 and is for the axle mounted variant only.

I also believe that Phillips bought the Resilion company in 1954 and moved it from London to Smethwick. I think that Phillips wanted to develop Resilion as a specialist ‘lightweight’ component brand offering many different types of component. It certainly rebranded its existing ‘Phillips’ derailleurs as ‘Resilion’. The patent for the design of the Resilion Crimson Star derailleur lists Edward Arthur Millward as the inventor - just as for the 1949 Phillips derailleur patent.

I believe that the Resilion Crimson Star was produced into the 1960s, but after that Phillips, now part of the Raleigh operation, gave up manufacturing derailleurs.

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